Search

The Soldier and the Squirrel introduces children to the Purple Heart

through a loving story of a friendship between a newly wounded soldier

and Rocky the squirrel with his backyard friends. This story began as a

blog during my first year in bed after my incident. With much

encouragement, it is now a book and has been placed in the

Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum. Please watch the video

on the About page to learn for the Soldier & Rocky are changing children's

lives.

 

ORDER NOW

 

 

Glorious Rejoice Dots Glitter

JOIN THE

FRIED NERVES AND JAM

PODCAST!

 


Subscribe to the Fried Nerves and Jam Podcast!

Socializing
Main | The Canvas - A Reflection on What Happened to Me »
Wednesday
Feb152017

How To Train A Puppy

I know, wow is this a twist of conversation! However, this is how this brain works. Give a girl a cookie and she turns it to a dog treat! 

 

My friend just got a puppy for her family. A precious Golden Doodle oodling cuteness through its pores. However the reality of owning a puppy has hit hard and fast and having trained numerous pups of our own, including my service dog, I have learned a few tips along the way. 
Enduring a puppy is SO hard. You are not alone! I swear the first time I experienced taming this beast I realized why God made them so darn irresistible we can't imagine looking at them the wrong way. But believe me, it does pass! But only if you truly got a pup with the intention of reserving six to nine months of your life to dedicate a part of your soul to molding him into the family member he's meant to be. Begin by tethering him to your side. I literally had to do this with my service animal, Blue Belle. It took ten months, she almost ran me into oncoming traffic twice, but how I wouldn't trade those curveballs now for anything in this world. 
Take him EVERYWHERE you can. Expose him constantly. Take him out on the grass every 40 minutes and praise him when he goes. 
Blue was the most untrainable dog EVER. I mean it. The fact that we could not leash train her is the very reason she works for me as a service animal because she pulls me everywhere I go. But she had to learn everything else , every single move I make - opening doors etc. but no great effort was really needed, it just happened naturally with time and repetition. Over time, she sensed what she was supposed to do. I just had to be willing to commit myself to be a Siamese twin for as long as it took for her to become my world. It took 10 months, but we did it! She's still learning every day. But if a dog isn't fully immersed in YOUR routine, not one you are trying to create for HIM, he will naturally fall in line, but it's going to take time. 
If you can't take him with you, put him in a crate. They actually don't mind it. A little blanket, bone and water and they're off to dreamland. Also, they are averse to soiling their own quarters so will at least try not to pee. 
Keep a bone around 100% of the time. He's teething constantly and it's painful so if he chews it's the one thing that helps. This is when our pups are so often disciplined as being a bad dog, when actually they are only doing what comes naturally and don't know another way. Of course nip his nose and say no to your things, but then replace it right away with the bone or toy and praise his cute little nose. 
When he's around 8 - 12 weeks old and has had his appropriate shots, start taking him to the dog park at least twice a week. Go into the small dog pen and let him run around and smell and socialize with other dogs. The larger dogs are not a problem, it's more that their size can be a bit of a challenge for small pups to be around. If you try to attend a "Puppy Hour" at your local pet store, remember, there are a hundred pound six month old puppies too, so don't be surprised if you find yourself a bit shocked when a Great Dane used your Fido as a soccer ball. 
Socializing outdoors is a way for him to adventure but also discovering you as a protector and pack leader. He'll start following behind you and hiding behind your legs. It's ok and so important he's exposed to other dogs with you as his teammate. Keeping him away from other dogs is one of the worst things to do. It's also a way to get his energies out by playing, he will also sleep better at home and not use his unspent energy tearing up his own home!
Sometimes a play pen is a good idea! 
Keep the pee pads out but start moving them closer to the door where he's going out to pee. 
Get a baby gate so he doesn't wander upstairs and pee on the carpet and in bedrooms. 
Remove all carpets or rugs from downstairs if you can until he's trained. It saves a ton of stress and carpets too. 
The less area he has to wander free, the less damage he can do. 
Open your front door and place a baby gate in the doorway. I use a nice fire guard that is easy to put up or move. I like fire guards that sit flush to the ground because I can choose a pretty barrier to the entrance of our home and it will keep him from squeezing through underneath to get out. However our dogs are grown and trained so a guard acts as a deterrent. For pups, I'd recommend a secure baby gate. (It'll get your neighbors talking, too.) He will learn that when people come to the door it's a good thing. As he watches outside through the gate he'll see other dogs and kids and cars and become familiar with the sounds and visuals that often make dogs nervous or react. 
In regard to food, never leave a full bowl out to graze. Feed him once in the morning and once at night at the same time each day. If you're going to give him a snack. Please make it a healthy piece of chicken or meat. So many foods, even fruits, can be bad for him and his tummy. Can't get mad if he poops green aliens out of his bum because you decided a celery stick would be a good substitute for a bone. 
Leave fresh water out all of the time, especially in the crate. 
But most of all try to be patient. A dog is truly only as good as the effort put forth by its owner. He came into your life for a reason, it's up to you what that lesson is meant to be. 

My friend just got a puppy for her family. A precious Golden Doodle oodling cuteness through its pores. However the reality of owning a puppy has hit hard and fast and having trained numerous pups of our own, including my service dog, I have learned a few tips along the way. 
Enduring a puppy is SO hard. You are not alone! I swear the first time I experienced taming this beast I realized why God made them so darn irresistible we can't imagine looking at them the wrong way. But believe me, it does pass! But only if you truly got a pup with the intention of reserving six to nine months of your life to dedicate a part of your soul to molding him into the family member he's meant to be. Begin by tethering him to your side. I literally had to do this with my service animal, Blue Belle. It took ten months, she almost ran me into oncoming traffic twice, but how I wouldn't trade those curveballs now for anything in this world. Take him EVERYWHERE you can. Expose him constantly. Take him out on the grass every 40 minutes and praise him when he goes. Blue was the most untrainable dog EVER. I mean it. The fact that we could not leash train her is the very reason she works for me as a service animal because she pulls me everywhere I go. But she had to learn everything else , every single move I make - opening doors etc. but no great effort was really needed, it just happened naturally with time and repetition. Over time, she sensed what she was supposed to do. I just had to be willing to commit myself to be a Siamese twin for as long as it took for her to become my world. It took 10 months, but we did it! She's still learning every day. But if a dog isn't fully immersed in YOUR routine, not one you are trying to create for HIM, he will naturally fall in line, but it's going to take time. If you can't take him with you, put him in a crate. They actually don't mind it. A little blanket, bone and water and they're off to dreamland. Also, they are averse to soiling their own quarters so will at least try not to pee. 
Keep a bone around 100% of the time. He's teething constantly and it's painful so if he chews it's the one thing that helps. This is when our pups are so often disciplined as being a bad dog, when actually they are only doing what comes naturally and don't know another way. Of course nip his nose and say no to your things, but then replace it right away with the bone or toy and praise his cute little nose. 
When he's around 8 - 12 weeks old and has had his appropriate shots, start taking him to the dog park at least twice a week. Go into the small dog pen and let him run around and smell and socialize with other dogs. The larger dogs are not a problem, it's more that their size can be a bit of a challenge for small pups to be around. If you try to attend a "Puppy Hour" at your local pet store, remember, there are a hundred pound six month old puppies too, so don't be surprised if you find yourself a bit shocked when a Great Dane used your Fido as a soccer ball. Socializing outdoors is a way for him to adventure but also discovering you as a protector and pack leader. He'll start following behind you and hiding behind your legs. It's ok and so important he's exposed to other dogs with you as his teammate. Keeping him away from other dogs is one of the worst things to do. It's also a way to get his energies out by playing, he will also sleep better at home and not use his unspent energy tearing up his own home!Sometimes a play pen is a good idea! Keep the pee pads out but start moving them closer to the door where he's going out to pee. Get a baby gate so he doesn't wander upstairs and pee on the carpet and in bedrooms. Remove all carpets or rugs from downstairs if you can until he's trained. It saves a ton of stress and carpets too. The less area he has to wander free, the less damage he can do. Open your front door and place a baby gate in the doorway. I use a nice fire guard that is easy to put up or move. I like fire guards that sit flush to the ground because I can choose a pretty barrier to the entrance of our home and it will keep him from squeezing through underneath to get out. However our dogs are grown and trained so a guard acts as a deterrent. For pups, I'd recommend a secure baby gate. (It'll get your neighbors talking, too.) He will learn that when people come to the door it's a good thing. As he watches outside through the gate he'll see other dogs and kids and cars and become familiar with the sounds and visuals that often make dogs nervous or react. In regard to food, never leave a full bowl out to graze. Feed him once in the morning and once at night at the same time each day. If you're going to give him a snack. Please make it a healthy piece of chicken or meat. So many foods, even fruits, can be bad for him and his tummy. Can't get mad if he poops green aliens out of his bum because you decided a celery stick would be a good substitute for a bone. Leave fresh water out all of the time, especially in the crate. But most of all try to be patient. A dog is truly only as good as the effort put forth by its owner. He came into your life for a reason, it's up to you what that lesson is meant to be. 

 

 

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>